Uncategorized

Thinking Yourself Fit

The Energy Mind Game

I’m pretty stubborn and I don’t compromise on much that’s related to my career, personal beliefs or health. However, that doesn’t mean I love all things healthy or that I don’t have days where I just don’t feel like exercising. But I’ve learned that in life, you sometimes have play some mind games with yourself to power through the things you don’t love to get to the things you enjoy. For many people, exercise and healthy living are at the top of the list of things they don’t feel like doing. So, can you talk yourself into being more fit? Having more energy?

My favorite celebrity trainer, Chalene Johnson, a high-energy, motivating dynamo from Southern California has a quote that I absolutely love. “Energy is a state of mind. Tell yourself you’re tired and you will be. Tell yourself you have energy and you will.”

Is it Really All in Your Head?

Chalene’s quote has always resonated with and motivated me, but I wondered if there was any truth to it? Is energy something we can just tell our brains and bodies we have? Turns out you can fake it ‘til you make it to get your body up and moving. I did the research to explain it and have boiled it down to these points.

  • Self-talk is powerful. If you grew up in a family with an “I can’t” or “it’s hard” mentality, you may be wired to quit when something gets tough. Worse yet, you may not even try because you’re convinced you’ll fail. These behaviors become powerful habits that keep us stuck.
  • Energy attracts like energy. For many people, they carry that negative energy into adulthood and surround themselves with like-minded people. Thus, continuing the self-doubt, destined-to-fail attitude in all aspects of their lives – career, relationships and wellness.
  • Negative self-talk is a habit you can change. Here’s the good news. You may have a propensity for negative energy but it’s not a life sentence. By reframing the inner-talk, you can change your energy and move yourself and your goals forward.

How to Master that Inner Dialogue

In reflecting on how I power through when I don’t feel like it, and my inner voice is saying, “stay here in this warm bed,” here are my tips for fooling your mind into getting up and moving.

  • Use the 5 Second Rule (check it out here). A big influence in my life is Mel Robbins. She is an author and motivational speaker who used the power of 5 seconds to propel herself out of bed and into a successful life and career. Check out the link above but the quick explanation is this…when you have an impulse to do something like working out, but you aren’t self-motivated to do so, count back from 5 to 0 and physically MOVE. When you do, you prevent your brain from talking you out of it. It can be used for anything and everything in your life, especially wellness. I use it to walk away from that second cookie or the impulse to have another glass of wine at happy hour.
  • Give it 5 Minutes. This is a Chalene Johnson hack that I’ve used for years. I make a deal with myself that I’ll give exercise 5 minutes. If I still feel tired/unmotivated/cranky, I’ll stop. I can count on one hand the number of times I stopped working out in over 10 years.
  • Get it Over With. When you put off exercise or anything until “later” you spend the whole day making excuses about why you can’t. You will put everything and everyone ahead of that 1 hour of gym time. Don’t do it later…get up, lace up and go.
  • Everything Counts. Many times, we talk ourselves out of exercise because we believe we must ‘go hard or go home’. Ditch that belief and know that a 30-minute walk or a gentle yoga session is often all you need to gain the benefits of movement when you just don’t want to feel exhausted.
  • Plan your Days On/Off. If I already know what days I’m working out and when I’m not, I don’t feel the pressure of having to decide and have that inner debate every day. Schedule your workouts and your rest days. Put them on your calendar and treat them like any other meeting or appointment. It frees you from making that decision daily.

Flip the Script in Your Mind

So much of what we do physically is controlled by our thoughts and attitudes. How we speak to ourselves and what we say in those moments of decision-making are critical to living a healthy life. Impulses to eat better and to exercise more are fleeting, we must recognize them and act before we talk ourselves out of it.

Want more healthy-living tips? Join me in my Facebook group, Fit, Fab and Fierce Women or message me for a free wellness assessment.

Personal wellness, Uncategorized

Dare to Compare?

working on my own grass

Dare to Compare?

The Dangers of Trying to Be Someone Else

Have you heard this one…Comparison is the thief of joy? Sounds cliché but there is some truth to it. Constant comparison and “trying to keep up,” will not only steal your joy but also your motivation, confidence and focus.

Quick story about the danger of comparison…I once attended a business meeting and there was a woman wearing the same dress. She was tall, blonde, all legs and in my mind, 100 lbs. less than me. I had a jacket on, so it wasn’t as noticeable that we were wearing the same dress, but I spent the entire meeting comparing everything from the thickness of my hair (hers was beautifully thick and wavy) to the circumference of my ankles to the length of my eyelashes in comparison to her. By the end of the meeting I concluded that I was basically Shrek and needed to lose 50 lbs., get false eyelashes and find a way to grow thick blonde hair. Okay…so maybe I’m exaggerating a bit here, but I did spend considerable time comparing myself to someone I could NEVER look like, instead of focusing on the meeting, contributing to the conversation and providing value. Ridiculous, right?

When I used to think of comparison, I thought of it more like competition and I’m a fiercely competitive, Type A gal. I thought that by paying attention to and striving to be like those I considered “high achievers”, it would keep me on my toes and motivated. Until I realized that, most times, it didn’t matter what I did or how hard I worked, I was never going to be the person whose life I held in such high esteem. Not because I didn’t have the drive or ambition – got plenty of both. Rather, because their achievements didn’t fit my lifestyle, career choices, body composition, etc.

You see, comparisonitis (yes, it’s like a disease) or the act of relentlessly measuring our lives/bodies/careers by someone else’s standards, is a dangerous and exhausting endeavor. When healthy admiration and motivation turns to non-stop self-judgement and berating, we have no joy in our lives and we miss out on celebrating the amazing things we DO achieve, every damn day!  Ultimately, the act of measuring our worth, accomplishments and progress against someone else stifles our efforts, damages our self-esteem and leaves us miserable.

Why we do it?

I’d love to say this is a new thing with the dawn of social media and all the filters that make us look better and seem awesome. However, keeping up with the Joneses has been around a long time. It’s just that now the reminders of our shortcomings is like a 24/7 cable news broadcast.

Like I said, I think relentless comparison starts as innocent motivation. Let’s take fitness as an example. We decide to get fit and start to follow a fitness celebrity or trainer because they are successful in weight loss and creating a healthy and fit lifestyle.  Yay! That’s what we are supposed to do – surround ourselves with positive people who set a good example. They don’t have to be famous – it could be your neighbor who teaches a spin class and has 12-pack abs. That motivation in and of itself isn’t unhealthy. People we admire help us see what’s possible, and they encourage us to act. All good things. The danger lies in when we go from inspiration to deflation because you haven’t achieved exactly what they have, and you tell yourself you’re a failure who will never measure up.

What’s the harm?

So, what’s the big deal? A little motivation and healthy competition is good, right? Sure. In small, reasonable doses. When that motivation turns to self-judgement and defeat or worse yet, a time-consuming obsession, you risk setting yourself back and even quitting all together because you feel like a complete failure. Here are some signs you’re heading down a dangerous path.

  • You become distracted. All you can see is what you HAVEN’T accomplished. So, you start doing anything and everything to achieve that “ideal body.” And, when you’re doing everything you’re likely not accomplishing much. By veering off the plan you set to achieve your goals, you become distracted and risk losing ground on what you’re after – the healthiest version of YOU!
  • You become defeated. You know that feeling when you’ve been working hard to do something and you’re not making progress? The feeling of exhaustion, frustration and failure. When you have that feeling all the time you end up defeated and discouraged and may decide to throw in the towel. I mean, if I can’t look like Beyoncé, then why bother, right?
  • You develop a skewed sense of reality. When you start to believe that everything you see online is real, it’s time to pull back and re-evaluate. Most of what you see on social media is NOT REAL life. It’s filtered and Photoshopped. It’s the “highlight reel” not the boring, messy crap that we all deal with. The neighbor who seems to have it all together, has laundry piling up, deadlines she missed and cranky kids. You just don’t get the behind-the-scenes tour of her life, so it seems all good. When that’s all you see, it’s easy to fall into the trap of trying to live up to the same standards.

How can you avoid it?

We all fall into the cycle of comparison and competition but how do pull yourself out? The worst thing that can happen is that you don’t see that you’re in the comparison vortex and you continue to spin and spin and become more frustrated.

  • Acknowledge it, feel it, move past it. We all go through this. Recognize it and then ask yourself what’s really going on. It may be guilt over not getting to the gym or ordering takeout too much lately. Your friend’s gourmet meal pic or her gym check-ins are triggering a little guilt. Instead of feeling terrible about it, stop scrolling on Instagram or Facebook and refocus on your goals. Plan to change the pattern. But don’t let it get a grip on you and kill your efforts to get healthy.
  • Take a break from social media. For real…remove one social media channel from your phone. You can still check it on your iPad or laptop but make it a little more difficult to mindlessly scroll. If you’re not ready to delete it, turn off notifications so you aren’t getting a pop up or little red dot every few minutes reminding you of all the awesome things you’re not doing. You can unfollow, pause, hide certain people, posts, etc. Take advantage of these tools to give yourself a break from the constant comparison.
  • Find gratitude for what you have accomplished. Look around. You have lots to be proud of and even more to be grateful for in your life. Acknowledge that. Grab a journal and every night before you go to sleep, write down two things you’re grateful for and two things you’ve accomplished or that you’re proud of (you packed a healthy lunch, your son got an A on a difficult test, etc.). When we remind ourselves of all the good in our life, it’s tougher to feel like a failure.

Comparison is inevitable. We are humans who need to feel good and successful. So, it’s ok to see someone and think, “I could be more fit like her.” Just recognize when healthy motivation and competition turns to relentless comparison and self-judgment. Your goals are unique and specific to you. Don’t jump off the path to follow someone else’s journey because you’ll end up going nowhere.

If you’ve had enough of the cycle of comparing, chasing and failing, take a minute and fill out my free wellness assessment here. Then, let’s chat. I’m ready to get you back on track and hold you accountable to your goals. I’ll help you become the best version of you so that your neighbor will be asking what you’ve been doing.